A house is not a home until you add love and family to the brick and mortar structure. But then again, a living space is brought to life by not just people, but by the different elements used for furnishing it. They create a first impression and give a taste of people’s cultures and lifestyle. They reflect the purpose of the space and create an ambiance, which is perfectly reflected by our home furnishing products, which have been handcrafted by our artisans with love.

Aari Embroidered Bedsheet


 

Jammu and Kashmir

Since its inception way back in the 12th century Mughal period, this art form has gained immense prominence over time. Floral motifs and traditional designs used by the royalties during the Mughal era brought Aari embroidery into the limelight. Aari is a type of embroidery design in which beads and Muthia, a sharp-edged needle, creates a type of chain stitch. The beauty of aari work lies in the details as it is the delicacy and fine threadworks which enhances the essence of this type of hand embroidery practiced predominantly in the Kashmir valley.

Applique Work Cushion Cover


 

Uttarakhand

Applique work employs ornamental needlework where pieces of cloth are cut out and then sewn back onto fine fabric to make a pattern. The fabric cut out is designed into popular motifs of the region such as flora, fauna, vines or geometric patterns and then hemmed onto the base fabric to make it more attractive. The colors chosen are vibrant and visually appealing for decor purposes. Different regions in India have their own style and central motifs in their respective applique crafts, some prominent states practicing the same being Bihar and Uttarakhand.

Applique Work Cushion Cover


 

Uttarakhand

Applique work employs ornamental needlework where pieces of cloth are cut out and then sewn back onto fine fabric to make a pattern. The fabric cut out is designed into popular motifs of the region such as flora, fauna, vines or geometric patterns and then hemmed onto the base fabric to make it more attractive. The colors chosen are vibrant and visually appealing for decor purposes. Different regions in India have their own style and central motifs in their respective applique crafts, some prominent states practicing the same being Bihar and Uttarakhand.

Applique Quilt


 

Uttarakhand

Applique work employs ornamental needlework where pieces of cloth are cut out and then sewn back onto fine fabric to make a pattern. The fabric cut out is designed into popular motifs of the region such as flora, fauna, vines or geometric patterns and then hemmed onto the base fabric to make it more attractive. The colors chosen are vibrant and visually appealing for decor purposes. Different regions in India have their own style and central motifs in their respective applique crafts, some prominent states practicing the same being Bihar and Uttarakhand.

Bagh Bedsheet


 

Madhya Pradesh

The word “Bagh” in Hindi language has several meanings; “a beautiful garden” being one of them. The word “Bagh” used in the world of crafts, however, refers to a completely different phenomenon. Located in the central state of Madhya Pradesh, Bagh is a small village which produces exquisite hand block print works with natural colors. Motifs of flowers, mango patterns, leaves and geometric shapes are incorporated as block designs in a variety of Bagh works, which indeed encapsulates a beautiful garden on the canvas of the fabric. The pinnacle towards awareness for this traditional art form was its adoption in a tableau theme of the state of Madhya Pradesh at the Republic day parade in New Delhi on 26th January, 2011.

Bagru Carpets


 

Rajasthan

Rajasthan is the home for a variety of handicrafts produced in our country. One of the lesser known places but no less important in terms of the value it adds to the rich heritage of the state is Bagru. Located on the Jaipur-Ajmer highway, at a distance of only 35 km from the Pink City itself, this place produces some impeccable wooden block prints which are considered as some of the best and elaborate hand-block printing works in the country. The beauty of this art form lies in the process itself as the preferred designs are first carved out on a wooden block and then used for further replication on any preferred fabric. The tradition of this craft is kept alive by native artisans, which makes Bagru a perfect tourist destination for connoisseurs of hand-block fabric printing.

Cotton Khaddi Carpet


 

Uttar Pradesh

Khadi has an iconic status in India because of its association with the father of our nation “M K Gandhi” and his Swadeshi movement. Khadi fabrics are hand-spun and handwoven from cotton fiber but it is not limited just to it. Contrary to popular belief, khadi silk and woolen khadi are also manufactured from silk and wool respectively. The beauty of khadi lies in the fact that it can be worn during both summers and winters throughout the country. Cotton Khadi is prominently manufactured by weavers from Rampur, a small town in UP. These weavers specialize in making carpets or doormats from any kind of discarded clothes and create durable, hand-woven khadi carpets.

Handprinted Sanganeri Quilts


 

Rajasthan

Sanganer, a town near Jaipur, was turned into a hand block-printing center by the royal family of Jaipur due to its favorable conditions of abundant soft water and clay material. And it still remains to be one of India’s most renowned block printing clusters. With its stylized floral patterns, creepers, vine, and floral net or jaal motifs, added to a vivid color palette of black, red, orange, dark blue, makes it certainly eye-catching. Products printed in Sanganeri art-form include printed skirts, veils, bedspreads, quilts and various kinds of apparel.

Jodhpur Cotton Dhurry


 

Rajasthan

There are only very few cities in India which can boast of a constant influx of tourists from around the globe throughout the year. Jodhpur is certainly one of those select few cities which can boast of this honor even though it neither has any mountains nor seas. What makes Jodhpur such a popular place is not only its palaces and lakes but also a niche group of handicrafts which are crafted locally by the artisans there. The famous cotton dhurries from Jodhpur knotted with exquisite and colorful geometric patterns is one such commodity. Although similar to a rug or carpet, dhurries are most commonly used for meditation and religious purposes which make it ubiquitous in most of the Indian households.

Kharad Dhurry


 

Gujarat

Kharad dhurry is one of the rapidly eroding art forms in India and that is exactly what makes it very, very special. This type of dhurry is made from a sheep or camel’s natural wool and then woven by hand on handloom. This technique is quite complex as it requires the weaving to be done with the help of two sticks working as a loom. It is a dying art and only a handful of families from Kutch in Gujarat (18 families to be precise) are left doing this kind of weaving. Kharad dhurries provide an exquisite, super exclusive and unique décor to one’s bedrooms and living rooms.

Madhubani Cushion Cover


 

Bihar

This art-form was originally a form of mural or wall art or Bhitti Chitra practiced in Madhubani in Bihar and showcased the feminine expression usually. It was used primarily in the past for ritualistic purposes such as paintings symbolizing important stages of a person’s life, festivals etc. Popular in the Madhubani art form are motifs of mythical figures, deities, nature and local flora and fauna. Most motifs are loaded with symbolic elements and quite recently, linking the cultural and economic setting of the painter’s life has become a very popular take on expressionism in this art. Both colorful and rich with symbolism, it is an invaluable piece of India’s art history.

Madhubani Embroidered Single Quilt


 

Bihar

This art-form was originally a form of mural or wall art or Bhitti Chitra practiced in Madhubani in Bihar and showcased the feminine expression usually. It was used primarily in the past for ritualistic purposes such as paintings symbolizing important stages of a person’s life, festivals etc. Popular in the Madhubani art form are motifs of mythical figures, deities, nature and local flora and fauna. Most motifs are loaded with symbolic elements and quite recently, linking the cultural and economic setting of the painter’s life has become a very popular take on expressionism in this art. Both colorful and rich with symbolism, it is an invaluable piece of India’s art history.

Sanganeri Block-printed Bedsheet


 

Rajasthan

Sanganer, a town near Jaipur, was turned into a hand block-printing center by the royal family of Jaipur due to its favorable conditions of abundant soft water and clay material. And it still remains to be one of India’s most renowned block printing clusters. With its stylized floral patterns, creepers, vine and floral net or jaal motifs, added to a vivid color palette of black, red, orange, dark blue, makes it certainly eye-catching. Products printed in Sanganeri art-form include printed skirts, veils, bedspreads, quilts and various kinds of apparel.

Zari Cushion Cover


 

Uttar Pradesh

As is the story with most of the crafts, Zari or Zardozi embroidery also got its name from a village by the same name in ancient Persia. Zari has always been associated with the affluent sections of the society in India and globally as well because it requires weaving thin threads of gold and silver onto fine fabrics of silk. The result of this intricate piece of designing is so exquisite that it completely justifies its monetary worth. Mughal Emperor Akbar can be credited for bringing a revolution in the emergence of Zari as one of the most sought after crafts and for developing areas around Agra and Lucknow as major clusters for this craft. As the impact of Royal patronage waned in our society, the gold and silver were replaced with gold or silver-plated polyester and cotton yarns or slightly costlier copper threads. Lucknow, owing to its Nawabi heritage, still continues to be the biggest market for Zari and Zardozi embroidery.

Zari Mats


 

Uttar Pradesh

As is the story with most of the crafts, Zari or Zardozi embroidery also got its name from a village by the same name in ancient Persia. Zari has always been associated with the affluent sections of the society in India and globally as well because it requires weaving thin threads of gold and silver onto fine fabrics of silk. The result of this intricate piece of designing is so exquisite that it completely justifies its monetary worth. Mughal Emperor Akbar can be credited for bringing a revolution in the emergence of Zari as one of the most sought after crafts and for developing areas around Agra and Lucknow as major clusters for this craft. As the impact of Royal patronage waned in our society, the gold and silver were replaced with gold or silver-plated polyester and cotton yarns or slightly costlier copper threads. Lucknow, owing to its Nawabi heritage, still continues to be the biggest market for Zari and Zardozi embroidery.

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